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Stonehenge - The Oldest In The World

  Duration: 10 days / 9 nights; Tour Type: Cultural, Historical; Best Period: May - October; Distance to be passed: 1300 km; Country: Armenia See more details

Holy Mount Ararat

Duration: 9 days / 8 nights; Tour Type: Cultural, Historical; Best Period: May - October; Distance: ~1080 km; Country: Armenia See more details

Guaranteed Departures

Duration: 8 days / 7 nights; Tour Type: Cultural, Leisure; Best Period: according to set dates; Distance: ~500 km; Country: Armenia See more details

Armenia – Top Destination of the year

Duration: 8 days / 7 nights; Tour type: Cultural, Historical, Wine; Best Period: March - November; Distance to be passed: ~1150 km; Coutnry: Armenia See more details

ARMENIA UNESCO

Duration: 8 days / 7 nights; Tour Type: Historical, Wine, Cognac, Hiking; Best Period: May - October; Distance to be passed: ~1550 km; Country: Armenia See more details

Following the Great Silk Road

Duration: 8 days / 7 nights; Tour Type: Silk Road, Cultural, Historical, Wine; Best Period: May - October; Distance to be passed: ~1050 km Countries: Georgia, Armenia See more details

Feel The Road from Armenia to Karabakh

  Duration: 14 days / 13 nights; Tour Type: Jeeping, Historical, Adventure, Wine Best Period: May - October; Distance: ~1900 km; Countries: Armenia, Nagorno-Karabakh See more details

Pearls of Caucasus

Duration: 13 days / 12 nights Tour type: Cultural, Historical, Wine, Gourmand Best Period: March - December Distance: Countries: Armenia, Georgia See more details

 

On the territory of Ararat marz are the ruins of another ancient Armenian capital city – Dvin. Built on prehistoric foundations, Dvin's emergence into history begins in 330s, when Arsacid king Khosrov II Kotak (r. 330-338) founded the city on a hill not far from old capital at Artashat (the word “Dvin” is a middle Persian word for “Hill”). Some 150 years after its foundation, in 481 Lord Nerses Bagratuni proclaimed Dvin Armenia's capital.

At its peak, Dvin's population may have reached 100,000, with Armenians, Jews, Arabs, Kurds, and others living together in reasonable harmony under a Muslim governor appointed by the Caliph in Baghdad. The Arab geographers reported that Dvin (called Dabil in Arabic) exported a wide range of wool and silk textiles, "Armenian wares" of a quality famous throughout the Muslim world, some elaborately figured and dyed with cochineal. Excavations at Dvin from the 1940s through 1970s revealed metal-working, glass-blowing, other luxury goods, and gorgeous glazed pottery, as well as coins from a mint that functioned at least until AD 930. The city was walled, with multiple gates labelled for the roads they served: to Ani, Tbilisi, Nakhichevan and beyond. The citadel was once thought to be impregnable.

The city was wracked by an earthquake in 863, rebuilt, and then almost destroyed by a second, more severe quake in 893, which buried alive 70,000 inhabitants. Rebuilt, Dvin continued as an administrative and religious centre. It was the Seat of the Catholicos from 475 to 914 (some sources claim till 918). Byzantium captured Dvin from the Bagratunis in 1045, then lost it to the Seljuks in 1064.

Its last flowering was the Zakarian period, with the eviction of the Seljuks by a joint Armenian-Georgian army led by the Zakarian brothers, Ivaneh and Zakareh, in the late 12th century. Unfortunately, time has not been kind to the site, and the intact mudbrick structures exposed at the time of excavation have in most cases slumped into unexpressive heaps. Much of the ancient site is presumably unexcavated, spread out beneath the surrounding fields and villages.